Spider Plant Care & Growing Guide

  • By: Carl Adams
  • Time to read: 6 min.

Spider plants are some of the easiest plants to care for, making them a great choice for beginner gardeners. With the proper spider plant care, you can successfully grow spider plants in your home.

In this guide, we will cover everything you need to know about spider plant care, from watering and fertilizing to pests and diseases.

We will also discuss how to propagate spider plants so you can share this easy-to-care-for plant with your friends and family.

How To Care For A Spider Plant

As mentioned above, spider plants are one of the easiest house plants to care for. With the proper spider plant care, you can successfully grow spider plants in your home.

Watering Spider Plants

When watering spider plants, make sure that the soil is dry down at least one inch into the pot before you water it again. If you water spider plants too much, you run the risk of getting spider mites.

Fertilizing Spider Plants

Spider plants should be fertilized about once a month. You can use a water-soluble fertilizer to easily fertilize spider plants without having to worry about reapplying.

Temperature & Light Requirements For Spider Plants

Spider plants prefer temperatures between 65 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit during the day, with a 5-10 degree drop at night.

Keep spider plants away from drafty windows and doors to avoid spider mites.

Spider plants also need a medium amount of light, so place them in a well-lit spot but out of direct sunlight.

Pruning Spider Plants

Spider plant care includes spider plant pruning as well. Cut off dead or dying spider plant leaves as soon as you see them ensure the spider plant looks its best.

If spider plants are getting tall and leggy, prune a few of the top leaves off at a time. This will encourage branching and keep spider plants looking bushy – just be careful not to cut into the spider plant’s main stalk.

spider plant care

Spider Plant Growing Guide

Spider plant growing is a breeze with spider plant propagation. You can propagate spider plants by either dividing spider plant offshoots or cuttings from

Growing Spider Plant Offshoots (Spider Plant Babies)

Spider plants produce spider plant offshoots that can be either potted up individually or placed directly into the soil.

To pot spider plant offshoots, choose a spider plant that has at least one spider plant offshoot growing from it. Fill an 8-inch pot to within 1 inch of the top with soil.

Place spider plant offshoot on top of the soil and cover spider plant offshoot with about 1 inch of soil.

Water spider plant offshoot thoroughly to settle the soil around the roots. If no spider plants are growing from your spider plant, you can take cuttings instead.

To do so, carefully cut spider plant offshoot from the spider plant.

Place spider plant offshoot in a pot filled with moistened potting soil and cover spider plant offshoot with about 1 inch of soil.

Water spider plant offshoot thoroughly to settle the soil around the roots.

That’s it – spider plant growing is a breeze with spider plant propagation. Now that you know spider plant offshoots, let’s talk about growing spider plants from seeds.

Growing Spider Plants From Seed

To sow spider plant seed, place spider plant seed on top of a pot filled with moistened potting soil and cover spider plant seed with about 1 inch of soil.

Water spider plant seed thoroughly to settle the soil around it and it should begin to sprout within one to two weeks.

Water spider plant seedlings regularly until spider plant seedlings are big enough to be transplanted into spider plant pots.

How To Get A Spider Plant To Bloom

It’s not difficult to get spider plants to bloom. To make a spider plant bloom you need to provide spider plants with cooler temperatures and less light than normal.

After about two weeks of providing spider plant care requirements for spider plant blooming, your spider plant should be in full bloom and ready to reproduce new spider plants.

Repotting A Spider Plant

To repot a spider plant, you’ll need:

  • a spider plant
  • an 8-inch pot
  • potting soil

Repotting a Spider Plant – Step by Step

  1. Fill an 8-inch pot to within 1 inch of the top with soil.
  2. Place spider plant on top of the soil and cover spider plant with about 1 inch of soil.
  3. Water spider plant thoroughly to settle the soil around the roots.
  4. If no spider plants are growing from your spider plant, you can take cuttings instead.
  5. To do so, carefully cut spider plant offshoot from the spider plant.
  6. Place spider plant offshoot in a pot filled with moistened potting

Spider Plant Pests & Diseases

Spider plant pests and spider plant diseases can be a problem for spider plants if spider plant care is not given properly.

Spider Mites

One spider plant pest you want to watch out for is spider mites. Spider mites thrive in dry environments and will latch onto spider plants.

You can tell spider mites are infesting spider plants if spider plant foliage begins to look yellow or bronzy.

Spider plant leaves will also turn spider-shaped as spider mites latch onto the undersides of spider plant leaves.

If spider mites are a problem for your spider plants, spray them with neem oil to kill spider mites, it will not damage the plant.

Mealybugs

Another spider plant pest is mealybugs, which latch onto spider plants just as spider mites do.

You can tell if spider plants have mealybugs if spider plant leaves start to turn yellow and become covered in a white cottony substance.

Spider plant mealybugs can be killed with neem oil as well.

Root Rot

Another spider plant problem spider plants may face is spider plant root rot (if spider plants are grown in water), which will make spider plants turn brown and die.

Spider plant root rot occurs when spider plants are grown in water or if spider plants are overwatered.

Your spider plant root rot can be treated by cutting spider plant roots and replanting spider plants in just their roots in a pot filled with moistened potting soil.

how to take care of a spider plant

FAQs About Spider Plant Care & Growing Guide

Q: What’s the best way to start spider plants from cuttings?

A: If spider plants aren’t growing from spider plant cuttings, you can place spider plant cuttings in pots filled with moistened potting soil and cover spider plant cuttings with about 1 inch of soil.

Water spider plant cuttings until spider plant roots are established (about one to two weeks).

Q: What does spider mite damage look like on spider plants?

A: spider mite damage on spider plants look like spider plant leaves turning yellow and spider-shaped.

Q: How do you stop spider plant cuttings from rotting when you’re propagating spider plants?

A: If spider plant cuttings are rotting when you try to propagate spider plants, wait until spider plant cuttings are established, fill spider plant pots with moistened potting soil and cover spider plant cuttings with about 1 inch of soil.

Water spider plant cuttings thoroughly to settle the soil around them. Water spider plant grow throughout their entire growing cycle to keep spider plants’ soil moist but not soggy.

Q: What spider plant pests are difficult to get rid of?

A: spider mites are hard to get rid of if spider plant care is not given properly or spider plants are grown in water.

Diseases like spider plant root rot, on the other hand, can be treated by cutting spider plant roots and replanting spider plants in just their roots (in a pot filled with moistened potting soil).

Spider plant pests and spider plant diseases can be killed with neem oil.

Q: How do spider plants get spider mites?

A: spider mites get spider plants if spider plant care is not given properly, so dry conditions (especially if spider plants are grown in water) can indicate spider mites.

Regular spider plant care should keep spider mites at bay, though.

Q: What does spider plant root rot look like?

A: spider plant root rot looks like spider plants turning brown and dying, with the roots of spider plants turning dark brown and spider plant leaves turning yellow.

Spider plant root rot can be treated by cutting spider plant roots and replanting spider plants in a pot filled with moistened potting soil.

Conclusion

Spider plants are easy to care for, and with a few simple tips, you can grow spider plants in your home successfully.

If you’re having trouble with spider plant pests or diseases, don’t worry – we’ve got you covered.

Neem oil can be used to kill spider mites and mealybugs, and root rot can be treated by cutting spider plant roots and replanting them in moistened potting soil.

With a little bit of TLC, your spider plants will be healthy and thriving in no time!

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